The past few months have been busy, as I’ve scrambled to wrap up the first round of interviews and performances for Don’t Give Up Your Day Job (my documentary about the life experiences of working musicians) while taking on an increasing variety of projects for hire. Here are some recent examples.

Rick Boler’s Bad Haircut

“The Bad Haircut” is a dark comedy by my old friend Richard Boler, an Erie writer who’s been published by the National Lampoon and written for stage and TV for many years. The play was performed in March at PACA performing arts center in Erie, and Rick is querying theatre groups nationwide about future stagings.

The production featured Scott Frisina, Leslie Ford, Camille Jones, Karen Schelinski, John Stockhausen, Mark Tanenbaum and Digg It Dave. A longer excerpt is found on YouTube at http://youtu.be/yhGBzJ376LU. You can contact Rick for more information.

Ray Flynt as Benjamin Franklin

Ray was a mainstay of Erie Playhouse productions a decade or so ago and now lives in Odenton, Maryland. He wrote and performed in Ben Franklin: An Ingenious Life at PACA in April, and is also looking for other opportunities to stage this engaging work. Here’s a preview.

Ray’s excellent costume is by Robert Mikrut, and his wig is by Jeanne Santos. You can contact Ray for more information.

Experimental Music by Holquist/Popp/Wilson

This piece came together literally at the last minute. Joe Popp is an old friend who used to run the Erie Art Museum Frame Shop and played in left-of-the-dial bands like Blood Pudding and Weirdo Theater. Besides making the art films that serve as a visual overlay, Joe is featured here on guitar. It’s a long piece but can be watched in parts.

Joe’s collaborators here are Adam Holquist (whom you might know as a recent contestant on Jeopardy) and Alex Wilson. This was performed as part of Adam’s Electroflux Experimental Music Series at Basement Transmissions in Erie.

That’s all for now. Today I’m off to shoot an oral history of Saint Luke Catholic parish in Erie, established in the wake of World War II to serve Erie’s rapidly expanding suburban population. Kids from St. Luke’s School will be conducting interviews with older parishioners about the long campaign to build the present-day church with its stunning display of stained-glass art.